Volleyball

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Volleyball

VOLLEYBALL EVOLUTION TO A GAME OF SPEED AND AGILITY

Volleyball is an exciting sport to watch because of the players amazing display of volleyball speed and agility. The action is non-stop from the time the ball is served until the last touch by a player from either side. But did you know that volleyball was invented as a sport for older people?

Because of the popularity of volleyball today, no one would think that when William G. Morgan created the sport in 1895 he intended it for men who were too old for the newly invented game of basketball. Volleyball speed and agility requirements were so different from fast-moving sports so it was really suited for men who were older.

 

The Growth of Volleyball

Volleyball took its form from two different sports: tennis and basketball. There were no prior sports similar to volleyball, so Morgan adapted the net of tennis and raised it higher. He also experimented first with a basketball bladder and the actual basketball for use in volleyball. Because these balls were not ideal for the game of tossing a ball back and forth, he commissioned the help of the company A.G Spalding and Bros to design a ball that would be more appropriate for the game.

The object of the game was simple: keep the ball afloat over the net by “volleying” it back and forth. Because it was meant to be a recreational sport, any number of players could enter the court and play. After a few demonstrations in front of several directors of physical education of the YMCA, a group was convened to pen the rules of the game and how it could be promoted as a recreational sport.

One of the first innovations of volleyball was the change in names, from “Mintonette” to “Volley Ball”. A slight modification in the name was made in 1952 when the name became just one word: Volleyball. After its inclusion in the sports programs of the YMCA, volleyball’s popularity spread beyond the shores of the US. By the turn of the 20th century, the game was being played in Asian countries like the Philippines, Japan, Burma, India, and China, as well as in countries in South America, Europe, and Africa. Since then, volleyball has been one of the most popular sports played all over the world.

 

Volleyball Speed and Agility Today

If the pioneers of volleyball were still alive today, they would find it hard to recognize the game that they first played. Today, it is an awesome demonstration of volleyball speed and agility. From the early beginnings of simply hitting the ball over to the opponent’s court, volleyball has become a competition of lightning-fast spikes, hard service, and explosive digs. The level of competition has become so high that specialized volleyball speed and agility training is needed.

Stretching

Stretching is one of the most basic volleyball agility drills that a player can practice. It allows the body to warm up before the actual game. It helps lengthen the muscles, avert soreness, and prevent injury.

 

Aerobic Training

Endurance is essential to every volleyball player. With games being played in 5 sets, all players must be prepared physically and mentally to fight a hard battle that could last for hours. Volleyball speed workouts for stamina-building include jogging and sprinting, and exercises like fast feet, high knees, side hops, and squat jumps.

Quick-reaction drills

Volleyball players must develop instinctive reaction in order to play efficiently in both offense and defense. Timing, balance, and coordination are needed by a player when spiking the ball. He also must have tremendous volleyball speed and agility in order to dive for the ball, jump to block the opponent, and pass the ball to a teammate to set up a play. The use of specialized volleyball speed and agility equipment helps players move on their feet nimbly and act decisively.

There are other volleyball speed and agility trainings that players can perform to bring their game to another level. Constant practice and total dedication to the game are keys to championship performance worthy of the volleyball predecessors’ pride and admiration.

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Tennis

TENNIS: THE ROYAL GAME OF SPEED AND AGILITY

Tennis is known to have started in France sometime in the 12th century when monks would toss a ball in the walls of their monastery using their hands. France’s Louis X became so fond of the game jeu de paume or “game of the palm” that he ordered indoor tennis courts built. Not long after, it became fashionable for royalties across Europe to have tennis courts inside their castles.

It took almost 400 years before a racquet was used in playing tennis. The name tennis was actually derived from the Old French word “tenez”, a call out made by a player which meant “take”, “receive”, or “hold”. Indoor tennis, however, lost steam sometime around the late 18th to early 19th century; but a technical innovation ushered in a new era in the sport.

Believe it or not, the invention of the lawn mower in 1830 paved the way for the development of tennis as an outdoor sport and to the establishment of the first Grand Slam event, Wimbledon, the most prestigious lawn tennis event in the world. Since then, tennis has grown by leaps and bounds and tournaments have become an annual sporting event followed by millions of people watching live or on television.

Modern Day Dilemma in Tennis

In the last two decades, tennis players have become stronger, faster, and more agile. The game itself has become a test of superiority in tennis speed and agility. A ball is often served at a speed exceeding 150 kilometers per hour (kmh) or more than 90 miles per hour. Topnotch players can even serve at more than 200 kmh.

With technological innovations on the rackets used, the game of tennis has become a game of speed. Serves became so fast that the governing bodies of international tennis had to intervene by making the tennis ball a bit larger to make it slower. Such development demanded better tennis speed and agility training to enable players to compete at a higher level.

Tennis Speed and Agility Training

With faster speed to contend with, the need to have better tennis speed and agility workouts has become even more paramount. It is no longer enough for a tennis player to move around the court and chase the ball. He must develop a quicker response time to be able to catch a ball speeding his way. This is where speed and agility training for tennis becomes essential.

The challenge of developing speed in tennis is unlike other sports where a player sprints in just one direction. A tennis player is expected to do a lot of lateral movements, quick bursts of speed, and have the sharpness of mind to determine the direction of the ball and follow it.

Speed and agility drills for tennis players must enhance their ability to move side to side and have the energy to accelerate fast in any direction. Tennis speed drills like hop scotch, in-out drill, and lateral ladder are just some agility exercises that a player can perform to raise his level of playing. The use of tennis speed and agility equipment is equally important as these tools will add more variety and challenge in the training.

The tennis players of today are a different breed of royalties. They are the kings and queens of tennis speed and agility and their performance inside the tennis court—lawn, hard surface, or clay—is always a joy to watch. Tennis competitions, whether amateur or professional, have reached a new height. With proper tennis speed and agility training, players of today and tomorrow will surely bring even more excitement and thrill to the game.

TRACK & FIELD SPEED AND AGILITY

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Track & Field

TRACK AND FIELD: FULFILLING CHILDHOOD DREAMS OF SPEED AND AGILITY

The biggest stadiums in the world are built to host large sporting events like the Olympics and they are designed specifically to showcase track and field speed and agility. Although not as popular of a team sports like soccer, it still has its share of followers and enthusiasts.

Who wouldn’t like to watch an event where a runner can run the fastest in a 100-meter race? The race is so fast that it is over before you can even blink your eyes. Track and field speed and agility is so unique because it can be over in just a few seconds.

Track and Field Simplified
Track and field is also known as athletics and is composed of several disciplines:

1. Track events

  • Sprints (100m, 200m, 400m)
  • Medium and long distance runs (800m, 1500m, 3000m/5,000m, 10,000m)
  • Hurdles (60m, 100m, 110m, 400m, and 3000m steeplechase)
  • Relays (4x100m, 4x400m)

2. Field events

  • Jumps (long, triple, high, and pole vault)
  • Throws (javelin throw, shot put, hammer throw, and discus throw)

3. Combined events

  • Pentathlon (5 combined events)
  • Heptathlon (7 combined events)
  • Decathlon (10 combined events)

Although there are teams created for track and field, all events except the relays are individual competitions where teammates could possibly compete against each other.

Track and field may not have hordes of fans like soccer, football, baseball, and basketball, but it is considered a growing sports discipline. According to the Infoplease data on sports participated in by high school students in the US during the school year 2012-2013, track and field came second to football in terms of male participants and is the top sport for high school girls—beating all the other traditional team sports.

2006–2007 2012–2013
Sex and sport Participants Sex and sport Participants
Male   Male  
 Football (11-player) 1,104,548  Football (11-player) 1,086,627
 Basketball 556,269  Track & Field (outdoor) 580,672
 Track & Field (outdoor) 544,180  Basketball 538,676
 Baseball 477,430  Baseball 474,791
 Soccer 377,999  Soccer 410,982
 Wrestling 257,246  Wrestling 270,163
 Cross Country 216,085  Cross Country 249,200
 Golf 159,747  Tennis 157,247
 Tennis 156,944  Golf 152,584
 Swimming & Diving 106,738  Swimming & Diving 138,177
Female   Female  
 Basketball 456,967  Track & Field (outdoor) 472,939
 Track & Field (outdoor) 444,181  Basketball 433,120
 Volleyball 405,832  Volleyball 420,208
 Softball (fast pitch) 373,448  Soccer 371,532
 Soccer 337,632  Softball (fast pitch) 362,488
 Cross Country 183,376  Cross Country 214,369
 Tennis 176,696  Tennis 181,116
 Swimming & Diving 143,639  Swimming & Diving 163,992
 Competitive Spirit Squads 95,177  Competitive Spirit Squads 116,508
 Golf 66,283  Lacrosse 77,258

* Original data from 2012-2013 High School Athletics Participation Survey by the National Federation of State High School Associations as published in https://www.infoplease.com/us/education/most-popular-high-school-sports.html

The Lure of the Track

Track and field is alluring to many children because it’s a sport that comes naturally to them. Running is part of everyone’s childhood and so is throwing things. The same can be said about going over hurdles as children enjoy jumping over fallen trees or just about any obstacle that blocks their way.

Even competition comes naturally. Finding out who can run the fastest, who can climb the highest, or who can throw the farthest are all part of the joys of growing up. Without them knowing, they are already doing track and field speed and agility training.

Fun and Work Combined

Equipped with natural track and field speed and agility, children are easily taught the fundamentals of the game. The objective of each of the events is simple—be the first. And to be the best, hard work and dedication is needed.

Although there are different disciplines involved in track and field, all athletes have something in common—the use of their legs. As such, speed and agility drills for track and field are mostly focused on developing lower body strength, muscle conditioning, and coordination. Specialized track and field speed and agility equipment are also used to help athletes perform better.

Track and field speed drills focus on developing quick reaction to be able to come out of the starting block immediately after the gun blast. Not only that, track and field speed workouts help athletes develop stamina to be able to make a mad dash for the finish line in the last few seconds of the race.

For field athletes, speed and agility training for track and field focuses on coordination of all body parts—from the lower torso that provides momentum to the upper body that controls the release of the object at hand.

Baseball

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Baseball

SPEED AND AGILITY TRAINING: IS IT REALLY NEEDED IN BASEBALL?

Baseball may look like a very simple game to play—you hit the ball, run to the bases, and tag home plate. If you’re playing defense, all you need is to catch the ball and throw it to the base players. Simple, isn’t it?

The Uniqueness of Baseball

Although batting accuracy plays the biggest part in winning a baseball game, there are other factors that actually contribute to a perfect game. Pitching, throwing the ball, and catching are the most basic, but there is so much more happening in the field.

Imagine an outfielder running after a ground ball, then making a sudden stop to throw the ball to the catcher to prevent the opposing player to score a point. All of these must come in one continuous motion—not an easy feat if you don’t have the proper baseball speed and agility training.

Baseball Speed Drills

The one of the simplest baseball speed workouts to practice is sprinting from home plate to first base (or from one base to another). Ten repetitions of this exercise will help develop the ability to cover a short distance in an equally short period of time. This ability is crucial when you want to steal bases or when you want to reach second or third base after the ball is hit.

Repetition of the exercise also conditions the calf and muscle legs for the demanding work. It is important to time each run to determine a baseline and to develop additional baseball speed drills for improvement. Running in sequence also helps a player strengthen his stamina.

A variation of the baseball speed and agility training using the bases is the base path run. The objective is run the course of the whole diamond at the fastest speed the player can muster. To add more challenge, the player must touch each base with his hand and using it as a pivot to direct his way to the next base.

There are other baseball speed and agility training that are designed for specific purposes like stealing bases, returning to first base after a pick-off attempt, or sprints to reach a base during game situations such as catcher dropping the ball.

Plyometric Exercises

Another set of speed and agility drills for baseball are plyometric exercises. These activities include different kinds of jumping exercises like squat, lateral, and broad jumps, plus squat jacks and jumping lunges. The goal behind these baseball speed drills is to condition the muscles of the legs to exert maximum effort in a short period of time.

Using a variety of baseball speed and agility equipment provides more challenge to the training routine of baseball players. It can also condition their mind to react swiftly and instinctively. There are also baseball speed and agility training that focus on developing better field awareness on the run. Being fully aware of what’s happening in the field helps a player make game-deciding plays when needed.

Speed in baseball is more evident when players run or steal bases as the spectators’ attention is often focused on the diamond. However, crucial plays also happen in the outfield. The timely reaction of the outfielders will help determine the outcome of the game. In a tense and equally contested game, the team that takes its baseball speed and agility drills to heart will more likely win the game.

Hockey

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Hockey

HOCKEY: FROM ANTIQUITY TO MODERN TIMES

Modern field hockey traces its origin from 19th-century England, but there were numerous ancient games that also showcased modern-day hockey speed and agility. What is even more amazing is that these games were played in places that were geographically distant.

Ancient Roots

When white settlers first set foot on the continent of Australia, they observed the local Aborigines played a game using a curved stick with dried sap as a ball. About a thousand years ago, “Beikou” was played by Chinese, Inner Mongolians, and the Daur tribe. Araucano Indians of Chile played a similar game called “chueca” even before Western colonizers arrived.

Ancient civilizations like Egypt and Greece also have their own version of this game played with a curved stick and a ball. The game is fully illustrated in 4,000-year old Egyptian carvings while ancient Greeks had their “kerhtizein” which was probably derived from the horn-like stick called “keras” that was used to play the game.

Whether all these versions of the game contributed to the development of modern hockey remains a mystery. Even the origin of the word “hockey” is uncertain. Historians associate the name to “hockie” which was found in edicts from the Middle Ages banning the game played with “hockie stickes”.

The Dawn of Modern Hockey

The 19th century was the epoch when organized hockey came into being. Several organization in England came together to define the sport and write down its rules and regulations. Since then, hockey gained popularity internationally. Pakistan and India even adopted the game as their countries’ national sports until India made a declaration in 2012 saying that there is no Indian national sport.

Today, international hockey is governed by the International Hockey Federation with 126 member-countries.

Hockey Today

Much has changed about the game of hockey. The pitch (playing field) is now made of synthetic materials instead of grass, sticks are constructed out of carbon fiber, Kevlar, or fiber glass, but the speed and agility demands on hockey players remain the same if not even more.

With everything being equal, winning a game boils down to the speed and agility of hockey players. With a more advanced playing field and equipment, hockey players need to be in tiptop shape to compete. Their conditioning must be well beyond average because the tools of the game allow for faster movement and better ball control.

Speed and Agility in Hockey

Hockey is played in spurts. It is comparable to soccer as players are required to run up and down the pitch during the entire game. Although sprinting is the least of the activities in the field, it is the most crucial as it allows the players to position themselves to score.

The ability to burst into action is one crucial aspect of a player’s game that needs to be developed during hockey agility workouts. Maintaining balance and control is important as a player navigates the field to get into a scoring position.

Because players perform different roles, each one must have their own unique hockey speed and agility training. The striker must perform several hockey speed drills to enable him to outrun opponents and score a point. In the same manner, the center halfback must be versatile and agile because he is required to play both offense and defense while passing the ball in different directions.

Hockey speed and agility equipment is also necessary in enhancing the players’ skills during practice. Alongside traditional practice methods, using various equipment for hockey training can further develop a player’s lateral movement, court awareness, and maneuverability.

Hockey maybe considered an ancient sport, but it surely has its numerous followers and players in modern times. High school and college players have as much fun with it as professional and international players. The game of hockey is fast, competitive, and tiring. With proper hockey speed and agility training, any player can perform way beyond his limits.

Rugby

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Rugby

RUGBY: WHEN BULK AND MIGHT COMBINES WITH SPEED AND AGILITY

6 million players, 120 countries: that’s how far-reaching the game of rugby is. This game whose name was derived from the school that made it popular was once just a pastime of young English students. It was believed to have been started by William Webb Ellis who apparently got tired of kicking a football and just picked it up and ran for the goal.

Rugby Origins

There were a number of sports similar to rugby—from the “Caid” of the Celts to the “Cnapan” of the Welsh. Even the ancient Vikings have their own version called Knattleikr. Ancient Greeks and Romans have their Phaininda and Harpastrum, respectively.

From the mid-18th to early 19th centuries, football in the Rugby School in England permitted carrying of the ball by hand. However, a player cannot run with it towards the opponent’s goal. Another unique feature of the game is the unlimited number of players which made it look more like a melee than a game.

There were numerous English schools that played a version of rugby with their own set of rules. It was, however, the Rugby School’s brand of play that became popular and widespread. Over the years, different rugby umbrella organizations were formed which set the rules of the game. It gained international recognition when British colonizers brought the game to the different corners of its empire and taught the locals the basics of the game.

Rugby Speed Training

Rugby players are a rare breed—they are hefty and stocky, yet agile and nimble. Their size is often deceiving because they can run like sprinters. What really sets them apart as athletes is their unique rugby speed and agility training.

Rugby speed drills depend on the position a player takes inside the pitch. A rugby player must concentrate his effort on rugby speed workouts that will allow him to cover the distance between points A and B at the shortest possible time.

Sprinting is one of the best ways to develop speed and agility in rugby. Coupled with the use of rugby speed and agility equipment, a player can hone his leg and calf muscles to release explosive energy to cover maximum distance in the least amount of time.

Rugby Agility Training

The purpose of rugby agility drills is to develop a player’s ability to move in any direction explosively. When in the playing field, a rugby player needs to elude opponents while looking for opportunities to score a try. Cone drills, box jumps, and barrier hops are some examples of rugby agility workouts. These exercises improve a player’s reaction time especially when he needs to make a sudden stop or burst into a sprint.

Rest and Recovery

While training is important, getting enough rest is also paramount for any rugby players. Body muscles must recuperate well before being subjected again to rigorous speed and agility drills for rugby. Sports experts recommend a 48-hour interval in-between laborious practice sessions. It is also important that quality is the focus of rugby speed and agility training and not quantity.

The Future of Rugby

Rugby is a competitive sport that has gained millions of followers and players all over the world. Both men and women have their own rugby competitions. Young and adult rugby players are now participating in various tournaments–local and international, amateur and professional. To become an excellent rugby player, total commitment to rugby speed and agility training is required. Only those who can dedicate themselves fully to the game of rugby will enjoy the sweet taste of success in this gruel

Soccer Speed & Agility

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Soccer

Soccer, more popularly known as football in many parts of the world, is the biggest spectator sports known to man. It is estimated that there are 3.5 billion people who follow the game of soccer, making it the most-watched game on the whole planet.

But what makes soccer draw such a large crowd? How can this low-scoring ball game create such a spectacle?

Poetry in Motion

The thrill of soccer is not in the goals made—it is on how individual players and teams show the fruits of their soccer speed and agility training. From the moment the referee blows the whistle to the start the game until the horn blows to mark its end, you will be amazed by the perpetual motion of the game.

Soccer is the suspense-thriller of the sporting world—each minute builds up to create tension and suspense. Fans watch in anticipation as offensive players show amazing speed in soccer as they run towards the goal. Each goal attempt is followed by oohs and aahs and a loud roar when the ball finds its way inside the goal.

Players are observed and admired not only for their ability to score a goal—which comes far and few in between—but also for their talent to play the entire game.

A Grueling Game

The regulation time for a game of soccer is 90 minutes, broken down into two halves of 45 minutes. An extra 15-minute playing time is provided when the score is tied at the end of the regular playing time.

In each minute of the game, individual players, regardless of the position they play, are expected to show topnotch soccer speed and agility. When inside the playing field, a soccer player needs to perform different activities such as:

  • Jogging – 36%
  • Walking – 24%
  • Coursing – 20%
  • Sprinting – 11%
  • Backward movement – 7%
  • Moving with ball possession – 2%

Although ball possession and sprinting are at the bottom of the ladder, these movements are the most crucial aspects of winning a game of soccer.

How can you develop into a versatile soccer player that can dribble the ball with your feet at breakneck speed? How can you outrun your opponent to put yourself in a position to score a goal? How can you develop the strength to have that burst of energy to leave your defenders behind?

The answer is in soccer speed and agility training!

Soccer Training for the Champs

Aside from the soccer drills like running, dribbling the ball, ball control, passing, and kicking, you also need to develop as a player through different speed and agility drills for soccer. According to the guidelines set by US Youth Soccer, the leading youth soccer developmental organization in the US, you can improve your soccer speed and agility through:

  • Body awareness activities: soccer drills that are focused in the use of different body parts to improve balance, coordination, and quick motion. You can achieve this by using a variety of soccer speed and agility equipment.
  • Maze games: Motion drills that allow a player to move within a defined area, but in different directions. There is soccer speed and agility trainings specifically designed to achieve this purpose and help develop a player’s instinctive reaction to actual play situations.
  • Target games: soccer speed workouts that are designed to achieve specific purposes, like improving soccer sprinting speed from one point to another.

Be the Best Player that You Can Be

The soccer field is one big stage that will test your talent as a player. The work to become the best player—whether in your schoolyard or community—is within your grasp. With the right soccer speed and agility training and equipment, you can achieve your own soccer dreams.

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Basketball

SPEED AND AGILITY TRAINING: IS IT REALLY NEEDED IN BASEBALL?

Baseball may look like a very simple game to play—you hit the ball, run to the bases, and tag home plate. If you’re playing defense, all you need is to catch the ball and throw it to the base players. Simple, isn’t it?

The Uniqueness of Baseball

Although batting accuracy plays the biggest part in winning a baseball game, there are other factors that actually contribute to a perfect game. Pitching, throwing the ball, and catching are the most basic, but there is so much more happening in the field.

Imagine an outfielder running after a ground ball, then making a sudden stop to throw the ball to the catcher to prevent the opposing player to score a point. All of these must come in one continuous motion—not an easy feat if you don’t have the proper baseball speed and agility training.

Baseball Speed Drills

The one of the simplest baseball speed workouts to practice is sprinting from home plate to first base (or from one base to another). Ten repetitions of this exercise will help develop the ability to cover a short distance in an equally short period of time. This ability is crucial when you want to steal bases or when you want to reach second or third base after the ball is hit.

Repetition of the exercise also conditions the calf and muscle legs for the demanding work. It is important to time each run to determine a baseline and to develop additional baseball speed drills for improvement. Running in sequence also helps a player strengthen his stamina.

A variation of the baseball speed and agility training using the bases is the base path run. The objective is run the course of the whole diamond at the fastest speed the player can muster. To add more challenge, the player must touch each base with his hand and using it as a pivot to direct his way to the next base.

There are other baseball speed and agility training that are designed for specific purposes like stealing bases, returning to first base after a pick-off attempt, or sprints to reach a base during game situations such as catcher dropping the ball.

Plyometric Exercises

Another set of speed and agility drills for baseball are plyometric exercises. These activities include different kinds of jumping exercises like squat, lateral, and broad jumps, plus squat jacks and jumping lunges. The goal behind these baseball speed drills is to condition the muscles of the legs to exert maximum effort in a short period of time.

Using a variety of baseball speed and agility equipment provides more challenge to the training routine of baseball players. It can also condition their mind to react swiftly and instinctively. There are also baseball speed and agility training that focus on developing better field awareness on the run. Being fully aware of what’s happening in the field helps a player make game-deciding plays when needed.

Speed in baseball is more evident when players run or steal bases as the spectators’ attention is often focused on the diamond. However, crucial plays also happen in the outfield. The timely reaction of the outfielders will help determine the outcome of the game. In a tense and equally contested game, the team that takes its baseball speed and agility drills to heart will more likely win the game.

Football

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Football

AMERICAN FOOTBALL: MORE THAN JUST BRUTE FORCE

Heads down, adrenaline pumping, eyes focused, sweat flowing down freely, all muscles tense—in a snap, all hell breaks loose. Helmets clash, bodies fall, movements everywhere, groans and grunts fill the field.

Such is the intensity of American football—a grueling and physically demanding sport that requires more than just brute force. Speed in American football is an essential skill required of each player. Speed is not limited to sprinting—players need to quickly respond physically and mentally to any game situation.

A wide receiver must be able to outrun the safety, receive a long pass, and score a touchdown. A running back must be quick on his feet to punch a hole in the defense while carrying the ball. He may even be required to run the whole field to score a touchdown if given the opportunity.

In the meantime, all other players must be quick and agile to tackle, block, or defend the quarterback or the field against the offense.

Speed and Agility Drills for American Football

American football speed workouts are designed to train players to be quick on their feet. Without this training, moving quickly will be impossible because of their bulk. The idea behind football speed drills is to condition the muscles of the legs and calves to spring into action at any given time.

Cone Drills

One of the best American football speed and agility training is the X-drill. It simulates game situations wherein a player needs to move in different directions. Using four cones as markers arranged to form a square, the player moves from one cone to another using different foot movement: running, shuffling, crossing over, and sprinting. Adaptability to changes in direction, footwork, and angle of attack are the essential skills developed using this football speed drill.

There are other variations of speed and agility drills for American football using cones, all with the intent of developing players’ instant reflex and flexibility of movement

Sprinting

Running short distances at breakneck speed is another way of training to develop speed essential to becoming a great football player. The forty-yard dash is the yardstick of performance used in American football. This performance measure was first used by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960s to choose prospects that they would send to training camp. Since then, NFL teams have used 40-yard sprint as a gauge of speed in American football.

Speed training for football adapts training methods of track-and-field simulating quick start from the block. Other variations focus on stride and the use of the balls of the feet to gain maximum coverage. Successive short sprints also help develop players’ ability to cover great distances in a short period of time. The use of a variety of American football speed and agility equipment further enhances the player’s ability to cover long or short distances in record-breaking speed.

Footwork and Balance

Football players must have the ability to change pace and direction without losing their balance. This is important especially for wide receivers who need to run down the field while looking back to catch the long pass from the quarterback. Defensive players also need to have perfect balance so that they can stand their ground without being toppled to the ground. The right kind of football speed and agility drills help players stay poised in spite of the onslaught from the opponent.

American football speed and agility training helps to develop players become more well-rounded. Furthermore, it keeps them away from injury because their muscles are prepared for the grueling demands of the game. With proper football speed and agility drills and equipment, they’ll be able to withstand the physical and mental pressure of the whole football season and beyond.